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Lipid profile of antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-infected patients attending infectious diseases service of University Teaching Hospital of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

Published on: 26th August, 2020

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8683051917

Introduction: HIV infection leads to metabolic disorders. The objective of this work was to study the lipid profile of HIV + patients followed at the University Teaching Hospital of Kinshasa (UTHK). Methods: This study analyzes the lipid profile of HIV + patients, aged at least 18 years, followed at the UTHK from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2014. The medians of different types of lipids, the frequency of lipid disorders, the general clinical characteristics of patients and factors associated with dyslipidaemia were studied. Haemoglobin (Hb), White Blood Cells (WBC), Leukocyte Formula (LF), Blood Sugar, Urea, Creatinine, Transaminases, Uric Acid, CD4s+ count were analyzed. Results: The lipid balance was performed in 38.8% of patients; 38.1% of them had dyslipidaemia. Total hypercholesterolaemia (28.6%), elevated LDL-C (19%), hypertriglyceridemia (23.8%) and HDL hypocholesterolaemia (42.9%) were observed. The medians of TG (128 mg / dL), HDL-C (51 mg/dL) and LDL-C (78 mg/dL) were high. Risk factors associated with dyslipidaemia were represented by WHO stage 4, tuberculosis (TB) and hyperglycaemia. The highest levels of LDL-C and TG and the lowest HDL-C were seen when CD4s+ were below 200 elements/µL. Conclusion: The HIV/AIDS dyslipidaemia characterized in this study by HDL-C hypocholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and total and LDL hypercholesterolemia can be considered as an indicator of the progression of HIV infection.
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Clinical and biological profiles of older adults aged 50 and over compared to those under 50 in people living with HIV attending Kinshasa University Teaching Hospital (DR Congo)

Published on: 28th October, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9322406717

Background: The survival of people living with HIV (PLWHIVs) is increased and Health systems will have to deal with the early-aging-associated medical conditions.Objective: The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and biological profiles of PLWHIVs aged 50 and over and those aged less than 50 years.Material and methods: This study conducted at Kinshasa University Teaching Hospital (KUTH) covers 6 years. The clinical and biological characteristics of PLWHIVs aged 50 and over were compared with those under 50. Statistical analysis used the means ± SD, the calculation of frequencies, Student’s t-test and Chi-square.Results: PLWHIVs aged 50 or over represented 35.1%. Their average age was 58.0 ± 4.8 years. Women predominate among those under 50 and men among those 50 and over. Married people were more numerous (54% among those under 50). There were more unemployed (50% of PLHIV under 50). Patients 50 years and older were significantly classified as WHO stage 4 with a high frequency of history of tuberculosis, genital herpes, high blood pressure, smoking, vomiting, hepatomegaly, moderate elevation of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and sytolic blood pressure (SBP), tuberculosis and anemia.Those under 50 had a significantly increased frequency of shingles, hepatitis B-hepatitis C, headaches and more survivals. The mean of Hb, HDL-C, and CD4s+ were significantly lower in patients 50 years and older, and urea, LDL-c, and ALAT levels were significantly higher. Conclusion: The average age was higher from 50 years old. These PLWHIVs were more frequently in WHO stage 4 with more common TB and anemia. Their Hb, HDL-C, and CD4s+ levels were lower while their urea, LDL-C and ALAT levels were significantly elevated.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat